Headache After Massage: Causes And Treatment

Numerous health advantages of massage therapy include its effectiveness in treating headaches. But some people could get headaches after getting a massage. So, what causes headaches after massages, and how are they treated? Massage activates the parasympathetic nervous system, which lowers blood pressure, heart rate, and stressors. This results in a reduction in stress and an increase in relaxation.

Numerous health advantages of massage therapy include its effectiveness in treating headaches. But some people could get headaches after getting a massage. So, what causes headaches after massages, and how are they treated? Massage activates the parasympathetic nervous system, which lowers blood pressure, heart rate, and stressors. This results in a reduction in stress and an increase in relaxation.

Massage therapists treat muscles and soft tissues with a range of treatments. Therefore, following a massage, significantly a deep tissue massage, you will notice that your muscles get softer. After receiving a massage, some persons complain of headaches, which they attribute to toxins entering the circulation from the muscular tissue. There is, however, no relevant scientific research. In the meanwhile, you can avoid this illness by avoiding certain other factors that are well-understood and addressed.

Typical headache causes

Typical headache causes

We must first learn more about headaches to understand further why we get headaches after receiving a massage. A headache is a typical symptom that can be mild to severe in intensity. Aching, intense or mild pain, etc., are all possible.

The most frequent form of headaches, tension headaches, can often include neck pain. One of the symptoms of a tension headache is most likely a headache after receiving a massage.

There are a number of typical headache reasons, including the following:

Blood pressure changes: When blood arteries in the brain are dilated, blood pressure fluctuations can result in headaches. Dehydration, hormonal fluctuations, psychological strain, muscular tension, specific foods that impact blood pressure, extremes in temperature, and sex can all affect blood pressure—excessive amounts of sleep, exercise, and rest.

Hormonal changes: One of the primary hormonal factors in headaches. The menstrual cycle, pregnancy, menopause, or the use of hormone replacement therapy, such as birth control pills, can all result in hormonal alterations.

Change in schedule, less sleep, stress: Headaches after the massage is associated with pressure put on the body, although tension headaches, in general, can arise when emotions and spirits are at odds. Depression, a change in routine, an inconsistent diet, excessive activity, and disturbed sleep.

Dehydrated body: Headaches can also be brought on by dehydration or a lack of fluids in the body.

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Headache after a massage causes

Following a massage, you could get headaches for the reasons listed below:

Irritants or sensitization: Some items in the massage room, such as scent, fragrances, cleaning supplies, bed linen cleaners, etc., might trigger allergies or sensitivities to this chemical.

Dehydration: Headache after a massage can result from both the dehydration of the body after the massage and the low water content in the body before the massage. Deep tissue massage, in particular, might raise the possibility of headaches following the massage.

Massage that is too intense: A massage that is excessively intense, particularly one that exerts a lot of pressure on deep tissues, can make muscles painful, bruise easily, increase blood flow, and provide headaches.

Blood pressure variations: For those with low blood pressure, standing up after spending a lot of time sitting or lying down might make their blood pressure fluctuate. Following a massage, some persons with orthostatic hypotension could have a headache.

When you get a massage, the therapist pushes, kneads, and utilizes their hands to work on specific body parts. These activities occasionally result in pressure points in your neck or head, which can cause headaches after a massage. This might occur for a variety of causes, including poor posture, prolonged towel laying, muscular weakness brought on by prolonged massages, or overuse of certain muscles. You should visit a doctor if it continues to be a problem.

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Proven techniques to lower your chance of getting a headache after a massage

Proven techniques to lower your chance of getting a headache after a massage

An excellent approach to releasing stress, easing discomfort, and discovering new facets of health is via massage. However, things are sometimes different from what they seem. One of the most frequent adverse effects of massage is headaches, which account for around half of all headaches after a massage. We’ll talk about prevention strategies in this blog article for headaches following your next massage.

How to manage headache after a massage

Refer to the following advice to prevent headaches following massage and to learn how to manage them:

  • Please let the massage therapist know if you believe the treatment is too intense.
  • Steer clear of deep tissue massages.
  • Describe the level of pressure you wish to use on the massage therapist.
  • Give your feet and head a massage instead of your entire body.
  • It’s crucial to have adequate water before and after the massage.
  • For two days before your massage, consume extra water than normal.
  • Avoid consuming alcohol before your massage.
  • After the massage, snack.
  • After the massage, you can perform a variety of muscle-relaxing exercises with the doctor’s supervision.
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Conclusion

Massage has demonstrated numerous health advantages, yet headaches can occur as a result. The headache typically originates in the neck and shoulders and is brought on by tense muscles. Your body may intensify the stress and inflammation in certain regions, resulting in discomfort. Ask your massage therapist why this occurs if the headache doesn’t go gone before they leave so you can prevent it from happening again.

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